Month: December 2010

Piezography Glossy Curves library

UPDATE: All new curves available at https://piezography.com/downloads/piezography-community-edition   <OLDER CONTENT> The is a curves update for QuadTone RIP users of the Piezography MPS Glossy system. Piezography Glossy printing is any type of printing on non-matte papers (including Baryta). These papers require our MPS inks which are both matte and glossy compatible due to additional layers of pigment encapsulation. All Piezography pigment is encapsulated to prevent agglomeration due to static charge. However, in order to adhere to non-matte surfaces, we developed two new inks (Selenium K7/K6 and Warm Neutral K7/K6) and a new photo black shade 1 (MPS Black: aka Selenium...

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Custom Piezography curves

Here is a step-by-step instructional for printing the target we supply when you have InkjetMall produce a custom Piezography curve for use with QuadTone RIP. We supply a special curve that is used as a “Master Curve” and a special 256 patch target that is printed. When you send the target back to InkjetMall for profiling, we email you the new curve. The instructions are different for matte and glossy media, whereas Glossy profiling gets an extra step. Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 (glossy option) Step 5 To install the master, GO and/or custom curve, please...

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Fine art paper and print head strikes

One of the most significant contributors to shortened print head life is the use of fine art paper. Use these preventative maintenance techniques to prolong the life of your print head. Most of InkjetMall’s customers use archival fine art papers made of 100% cotton. An archival paper is potentially more important to longevity of the artwork than the actual use of pigment inks. If a customer wishes to use inks with a low tolerance to illumination, the artwork can be enjoyed for decades in museum lighting or reduced interior lighting. But, if the customer uses the most lightfast inks available and prints on acidic or chemically sensitive papers, the artwork can self-destruct in just a few years when exposed to light. Acid-free 100% cotton papers typically do not deteriorate as do tree-pulp papers. There was a controversy many years ago when Epson’s “Archival” Matte Paper was found to deteriorate badly when exposed to light. Wilhelm had rated this paper with an Epson ink for decades and decades before noticeable fade. However, it was discovered that the paper yellows badly within two years of exposure to typical room illumination. The acidic content of the paper was anything but “archival”, and the paper was renamed to Enhanced Matte. Now it is Premium Presentation Matte. The majority of artists and photographers who use inkjet printing prefer to use archival cotton fine art...

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Cheap plastic lenses

Last year at this time, I bought a Zeiss Icon 21mm f /2.8 Distagon lens for my Canon 5D. Describing it as sharp as a razorblade from corner to corner would not be an exaggeration. At f/16 the lens is immaculate. At f/2.8 it is more my style, with a depth of field as narrow as a razor blade. I shoot mostly wide open at f/2.8. This year, I had my heart set on the new Zeiss Icon 35mm f/1.4 Distagon lens for my Canon 5D. And not just because it’s razor sharp from edge to edge when stopped down. Rather, I wanted an even tighter depth of field. But, it is not released until Spring. So, with the lens budget in hand I considered the 24mm tilt and shift Canon. And for whatever reason…I decided on a $60 Diana 38mm plastic lens and a $60 Diana 110mm soft focus lens. Both of these cheap lenses had Canon EOS adapters, but had little to compare in relation to the quality of a Zeiss glass or the Canon TS. I was nostalgic for Diana qualities. I studied photography in college at Ohio University. Arnold Gassan had all first year students shoot with Diana plastic cameras. Actually, we shot with Diana plastic cameras and chewing gum. The amount of light leaks in these cheap cameras was exorbitant. They required Wrigley’s spearmint,...

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